Unit Overview
Grading Criteria
P1 - Responsibilities
P2 - Legislation
M1 - Interaction
P3 - Identifying Hazards
P4 - Risk Assessment
M2 - Completing a risk assessment
D1 - Justify a Risk Assessment
P5 - Control Measures
P6 - Accident Reporting
M3 - Accident Data
D2 - Evaluating Accident Reports

P2 - Legislation

 

Criteria - outline the legal duties of employees and employers in relation to three pieces of health, safety and welfare legislation relevant to the construction and built environment sector.

 

Task -For P2, you must outline the legal duties of employees and employers in relation to three pieces of health, safety and welfare legislation relevant to the construction and built environment sector.

One of these must be the HASAWA 1974
You can also look at:

  1. Construction (Design and Management)
  2. Work at Height Regulations 2005
  3. Management of Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations 1999 (MHSW)
  4. Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996

 

 

The Health and Safety at Work Act

The HASAWA was formed in 1974, it is a very important piece of legislation as many other pieces of legislation are based on in. The HASAWA covers just about every industry in the UK from construction to manufacture.

 

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007

The CDM regulations are based on a European directive that looked at the main causes of accidents in construction. They found that 33% of accidents on construction sites could be attributed to the design phase of a project, meaning that designers where not thinking about the various scenarios that workers would be in when constructing their designs. The regulations concern five main parties:

 

  1. The Client
  2. The Designer
  3. The CDM Coordinator
  4. The Principle Contractor
  5. Contractors

 

Work at Height Regulations 2005

These were introduced to try and reduce the large number of fatalities in the construction industry that resulted from falls from height.

 

The regulations state that where possible a worker must avoid working at height, for example under Scottish building regulations all windows not on the ground floor must now be the type that can be tilted and cleaned from the inside of a building.

 

Where there is no choice but to work at height the regulations state that: 'Where work is carried out at height, every employer shall take suitable and sufficient measures to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any person falling a distance liable to cause personal injury'. The following precautions can be taken

 

  1. Secure scaffolding rather than ladders that can slip
  2. Mobile Elevated platforms or cherry pickers
  3. Guard rails, barriers and handrails
  4. Toe boards

 

PPE can be used to restrict how far a person can fall, such as a full body harness with a fall arrest or shock absorption system.

 

 

activity

  1. How does something become a piece of legislation?
  2. in what situations might someone be at risk from falling from height and what precautions should they take?
  3. Who would need to provide any equipment for a worker to avoid working at height?
  4. What jobs around the school do you think would constitute working at height?
  5. How high do you have to be, in order to be working at height?

 

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations 1999 (MHSW)

These regulations are intended to reinforce the message of completing risk assessments This piece of legislation's covers some of the following:

 

  1. Provision of first aid at work
  2. Checking employees health, eg hearing tests
  3. Keeping employees up to date on safety aspects
  4. judging the capabilities of employees (are they up to the job)
  5. Putting risk assessments in place
  6. Protecting people un 18

 

Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996

These were introduced to try and reduce the large amount of accidents that where happening each year in the construction industry. Under the regulations the employer has the following duties:

 

  1. Ensuring that the construction workplace is safe
  2. Ensuring systems are in place to stop workers falling from height
  3. Taking measure to prevent people working with plant falling into excavations
  4. Reducing the risk presented by traffic moving around on a construction site
  5. Providing suitable welfare facilities for workers
  6. Undertaking specific safety inspections

 

Link to student Notes on HASAWA

Link to student notes on Working at Height

Link to student notes on CDM